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Let's Go Dutch

I was listening to another podcast from NPR that further elaborated on how the Dutch are taking water management in another direction. They are now building floating slabs with flexible utilities in flood plain areas as well as inside the protected levee areas (that will no longer be expanded). The government is also paying people with farm land to use their property as an overflow, which tends to work better than trying to contain the rivers, and being surprised when the levee breaks. The point being for New Orleans is that it is a lot cheaper to work in harmony with nature, then trying to control her. That way, Louisiana can pay for her own water management, instead of relying on the rest of the country and the government.

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